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trumpcare 101


What is the Plan?

What is Trumpcare?

What is in it?

Republican congressional leaders have made clear they intend to move Trumpcare asap through budget reconciliation, which means no Democratic votes are necessary to pass it. See a Republican Study Committee announcement of the plan here.

The starting point for Trumpcare is H.R. 3762, the reconciliation bill that Congress passed in 2015 and President Obama vetoed. See the text here. Budget impacts of the bill are available here.

The key provisions include:

  • Repeal of funding for private insurance
  • Repeal of funding for Medicaid coverage
  • Repeal of a variety of taxes on healthcare companies and high income households
  • Repeal of enforcement of mandates on individuals and employers to maintain insurance
  • Eliminate funding for Planned Parenthood
  • "Banking" of Medicare cuts, rather than devoting them to coverage expansion

See a Republican staff-prepared section-by-section summary here.

What is the Impact on Care?

What is CBO?

What else?

According to CBO, Trumpcare will:

  • Eliminate coverage for 18 million Americans in 2018 by destabilizing the insurance market
  • Cut coverage for 32 million Americans over the next 10 years
  • Increase premiums for individuals by 20-25% in 2018 and double them in 10 years

See CBO's independent analysis of Trumpcare here.

You will hear about CBO a lot in the coming weeks. The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) is the Federal body charged with analyzing the impact of all legislation Congress considers. While not perfect, CBO is the most sophisticated, independent entity to assess the impact of Trumpcare. The current CBO Director was appointed by congressional Republicans in 2015 (see here).

Some Republicans suggest that, after passing Trumpcare, they will follow up with additional policies to replace what they have taken away. Unfortunately, those efforts will require 60 votes in the Senate (unlike reconciliation) and there is no indication at this point that consensus on any meaningful replacement can be achieved. Furthermore, Trumpcare leaves in place less than a third of the funding currently used for the coverage programs it repeals. So, whatever comes next is going to be extremely meager relative to what we have now. 

What is the Plan?

Republican congressional leaders have made clear they intend to move Trumpcare asap through budget reconciliation, which means no Democratic votes are necessary to pass it. See a Republican Study Committee announcement of the plan here.

What is Trumpcare?

The starting point for Trumpcare is H.R. 3762, the reconciliation bill that Congress passed in 2015 and President Obama vetoed. See the text here. Budget impacts of the bill are available here.

What is in it?

The key provisions include:

  • Repeal of funding for private insurance
  • Repeal of funding for Medicaid coverage
  • Repeal of a variety of taxes on healthcare companies and high income households
  • Repeal of enforcement of mandates on individuals and employers to maintain insurance
  • Eliminate funding for Planned Parenthood
  • "Banking" of Medicare cuts, rather than devoting them to coverage expansion

See a Republican staff-prepared section-by-section summary here.

What is the Impact on Care?

According to CBO, Trumpcare will:

  • Eliminate coverage for 18 million Americans in 2018 by destabilizing the insurance market
  • Cut coverage for 32 million Americans over the next 10 years
  • Increase premiums for individuals by 20-25% in 2018 and double them in 10 years

See CBO's independent analysis of Trumpcare here.

What is CBO?

You will hear about CBO a lot in the coming weeks. The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) is the Federal body charged with analyzing the impact of all legislation Congress considers. While not perfect, CBO is the most sophisticated, independent entity to assess the impact of Trumpcare. The current CBO Director was appointed by congressional Republicans in 2015 (see here).

What else?

Some Republicans suggest that, after passing Trumpcare, they will follow up with additional policies to replace what they have taken away. Unfortunately, those efforts will require 60 votes in the Senate (unlike reconciliation) and there is no indication at this point that consensus on any meaningful replacement can be achieved. Furthermore, Trumpcare leaves in place less than a third of the funding currently used for the coverage programs it repeals. So, whatever comes next is going to be extremely meager relative to what we have now.